The Media Files

A new monthly podcast featuring discussion between media researchers, experts and working journalists on the big issues in the media landscape today. Produced in collaboration with The Conversation.

Episodes

  • Pell trial reporters, a judge and a media lawyer on why the suppression order debate is far from over

    43 mins 39 secs

    When Judge Peter Kidd sentenced Cardinal George Pell last week, it was broadcast live on radio and television. It was a stark contrast to the preceding trial, which was subject to a suppression order that prevented any coverage of the proceedings.

    Today on Media Files we look at the suppression order that prevented the Australian media reporting the case, even when the verdict was widely known and was being circulated on social media and on the front pages of newspapers around the world.

    On the day of the Pell sentence the University of Melbourne’s Centre for Advancing Journalism brought together several experts with wide-ranging experiences of suppression orders to discuss how they affect the public’s right to know and whether the laws should be reformed.

    The panellists are:

    Associate Professor Jason Bosland, Co-Director of the Centre for Media and Communications Law at Melbourne Law School, where he teaches media and communications law. His primary research interests lie in media law, including defamation and privacy, open justice and the media, contempt of court and freedom of speech.

    Melissa Davey, Melbourne bureau chief for The Guardian. She is an experienced news journalist who previously worked as a reporter for Fairfax newspapers, including The Sydney Morning Herald and the Sun Herald. She sat through every day of the George Pell trial.

    Lucie Morris-Marr, a reporter who, like Melissa, sat through the entire Pell proceedings. She worked at the Daily Mail, London, Marie Claire Australia and the Herald Sun in Melbourne before covering the Pell trial for the New Daily. She is the author of a book on Pell entitled Fallen: The inside story of the secret trial and conviction of Cardinal George Pell.

    Frank Vincent AO QC, who served 16 years as a judge of the Supreme Court of Victoria followed by a further eight years as a judge of the Court of Appeal. He was Deputy Chair and then Chair of the Victorian Adult Parole Board, a position he occupied for 17 years. In 2017 he conducted a review of court suppression orders and the Open Courts Act 2013.

    The forum was chaired by Dr Denis Muller of the Centre for Advancing Journalism at the University of Melbourne.

  • Episode #7: From Trump to Brexit, The Guardian’s Kath Viner on the big media stories of 2018

    32min

    Today we’re taking a look back at some of the biggest issues of 2018 with special guest Kath Viner, editor-in-chief of The Guardian.

    As the media grappled this year with how to cover Donald Trump and his “alternative facts”, Viner says it may be time for the media to pay less attention to what he says.

    “Surely the thing to do is report on what is actually happening. So less on what Trump is saying but actually what his administration is doing,” Viner said.

    “We don’t hear about what he’s doing because we’re too busy commenting on what he’s saying.”

    We also talked about how newsrooms are funding journalism and particularly investigative journalism, in an era when journalists are increasingly vilified and even physically attacked or killed.

    Viner also identified what she saw as the major challenges ahead.

    “I think the other big challenge for next year is how we deal with the rise of the far right and how we report on it without inflaming it or over-exaggerating it,” she said.

    Media Files is produced by a team of academics who have spent decades working in and reporting on the media industry. They’re passionate about sharing their understanding of the media landscape, especially how journalists operate, how media policy is changing, and how commercial manoeuvres and digital disruption are affecting the kinds of media and journalism we consume.

    Media Files will be out every month, with occasional off-schedule episodes released when we’ve got fresh analysis we can’t wait to share with you. To make sure you don’t miss an episode, find us and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, in Pocket Casts or wherever you find your podcasts. And while you’re there, please rate and review us – it really helps others to find us.

    Producer: Andy Hazel.

    Theme music: Susie Wilkins.

  • Episode #6: Guardian Australia’s Katharine Murphy and former MP David Feeney on the digital disruption of media and politics

    45 mins

    Today on Media Files, a podcast about the major issues in the media, we’re taking a close look at the role of the news media in politics. As the Wentworth by-election looms, we’re asking: is digital disruption changing the rules of journalism and politics in Australia? It is easy to miss how disorienting it can be to work in the always-on-at-fire-hydrant-strength world of political journalism these…

    Media Files is produced by a team of academics who have spent decades working in and reporting on the media industry. They’re passionate about sharing their understanding of the media landscape, especially how journalists operate, how media policy is changing, and how commercial manoeuvres and digital disruption are affecting the kinds of media and journalism we consume.

    Media Files will be out every month, with occasional off-schedule episodes released when we’ve got fresh analysis we can’t wait to share with you. To make sure you don’t miss an episode, find us and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, in Pocket Casts or wherever you find your podcasts. And while you’re there, please rate and review us – it really helps others to find us.

    Producer: Andy Hazel.

    Theme music: Susie Wilkins.

  • Episode #5: What does the future newsroom look like?

    28 mins

    Today on Media Files, a podcast about the major themes and issues in the media, we’re looking at the future newsroom. We often hear about the doom and gloom of established media companies as they shed staff and revenues, but is there hope for journalism and a new style of digital newsroom? We ask of the man with an ambitious mission to launch 100 media start-ups in three years: what does the future…

    Media Files is produced by a team of academics who have spent decades working in and reporting on the media industry. They’re passionate about sharing their understanding of the media landscape, especially how journalists operate, how media policy is changing, and how commercial manoeuvres and digital disruption are affecting the kinds of media and journalism we consume.

    Media Files will be out every month, with occasional off-schedule episodes released when we’ve got fresh analysis we can’t wait to share with you. To make sure you don’t miss an episode, find us and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, in Pocket Casts or wherever you find your podcasts. And while you’re there, please rate and review us – it really helps others to find us.

    Producer: Andy Hazel.

    Theme music: Susie Wilkins

  • Episode #4: ABC boss Michelle Guthrie sacked, but the board won’t say why

    20min 30secs

    The major question following the sacking of ABC managing director Michelle Guthrie is why? Why did the ABC board move so decisively and why now?

    Was it just about tension between her and the corporation chair, Justin Milne, or was it about strategic direction for the national broadcaster?

    In this special edition of Media Files, Monash University’s Margaret Simons and former ABC staff-elected director Matt Peacock talk to Matthew Ricketson and Andrew Dodd about what it might mean for the ABC – particularly in the lead up to a federal election.

    Media Files is produced by a team of journalists and academics who have spent decades working in and reporting on the media industry. They’re passionate about sharing their understanding of the media landscape, especially how journalists operate, how media policy is changing, and how commercial manoeuvres and digital disruption are affecting the kinds of media and journalism we consume.

    Media Files will be out every month, with occasional off-schedule episodes released when we’ve got fresh analysis we can’t wait to share with you. To make sure you don’t miss an episode, find us and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, in Pocket Casts or wherever you find your podcasts. And while you’re there, please rate and review us – it really helps others to find us.

    Producer: Andy Hazel.

    Theme music: Susie Wilkins.

  • Episode #3: On the Serena Williams cartoon – and how the UK phone hacking scandal led to a media crackdown in South Africa

    33min 23secs

    Mark Knight’s cartoon in The Herald Sun has become a global topic of condemnation and debate because of its negative portrayal of American tennis player Serena Williams. It was widely described as racist.

    The news of the cartoon broke last week while we were both at a conference in South Africa. We decided to show the cartoon to some local academics with expertise in the study of media, race and gender to gauge their reactions because few places have dealt with issues of racism more comprehensively than South Africa.

    Listen in to this episode to hear the responses of Dr Shepherd Mpofu of the University of Limpopo and Dr Julie Reid and Dr Rofhiwa Mukhudwana of the Department of Communication Science at the University of South Africa.

    Media Files is produced by a team of journalists and academics who have spent decades working in and reporting on the media industry. They’re passionate about sharing their understanding of the media landscape, especially how journalists operate, how media policy is changing, and how commercial manoeuvres and digital disruption are affecting the kinds of media and journalism we consume.

    Media Files will be out every month, with occasional off-schedule episodes released when we’ve got fresh analysis we can’t wait to share with you. To make sure you don’t miss an episode, find us and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, in Pocket Casts or wherever you find your podcasts. And while you’re there, please rate and review us – it really helps others to find us.

    Producer: Andy Hazel.

    Theme music: Susie Wilkins.

  • Episode #2: Investigative journalism in the spotlight

    32 mins

    The Boston Globe’s Walter V. Robinson, of the famous Spotlight investigative team, and The Newcastle Herald’s Chad Watson on covering clergy abuse – and the threats that followed.

    If you’ve seen the movie Spotlight, about The Boston Globe investigative reporters who uncovered the staggering extent of child sexual abuse in the Catholic Church in the US, you’re already familiar with the work of Walter V. Robinson. He’s the one played by Michael Keaton in the film. In today’s episode of Media Files – a podcast about the media and how it works – Robinson shares his insights into journalism over his decades long career. Host – Andrew Dodd.

  • Episode #1: What does the Nine Fairfax merger mean for diversity and quality journalism?

    1hr 48mins

    In the pilot episode of our new podcast series is all about the Nine Fairfax merger, the largest media amalgamation in Australia in 30 years. Eric Beecher of Private Media, Stephen Mayne of the Mayne Report and ABC finance presenter Alan Kohler join presenters Andrew Dodd and Andrea Carson to discuss the implications for diversity and quality journalism.

    Media Files is hosted by Andrew Dodd at the University of Melbourne, Andrea Carson at LaTrobe University and Matthew Ricketson at Deakin University, who between them have decades of experience reporting on and researching the media. Media Files will also involve journalists, editors and other practitioners reflecting on topics such as ethics, digital disruption and the trends affecting what we hear, watch and read. It is produced in collaboration with The Conversation.